Crossing over dive leaders to PADI Professionals

By Tony Cook, PADI Regional Training Consultant

Frankie owns a PADI Five Star Dive Resort in Thailand. At a local bar after work, he chats to a group of French tourists. One of them, Amina, says she is a dive leader from France and is looking for work in Thailand. Frankie does need a new instructor, but tells her he can only employ PADI Pros. He says she should contact him again if she eventually gets her PADI qualification.

What opportunities has Frankie just lost?

  1. A potential employee.
  2. Greater income from new students. While there is a cost for Frankie in crossing a diver over from recognized French organisation to PADI, the potential income she could generate is far greater.
  3. Fresh ideas – Amina might have other great skills like social media or IT skills that Frankie doesn’t have.
  4. New markets – Amina could attract more French and European customers to Frankie’s business.

Crossover process

What Frankie didn’t know is that a dive leader in good standing qualified with another diver training organisation can cross over to PADI via the PADI Assistant Instructor (AI) course or the PADI Instructor Development Course (IDC). They do not have to repeat what they already know and can do.

*Remember to contact and involve your PADI Regional Training Consultant early in the crossover process if you have any questions on eligibility.

What should Frankie have done instead?

Frankie should have checked Amina’s qualifications together with Steve, a PADI IDC Staff Instructor who works for him.  After verifying that all the course prerequisites have been met, Steve could have enrolled Amina in the AI course*. Steve would then have conducted a knowledge and skill pre-assessment with Amina – any necessary remediation training can be personalised and scheduled before the start of the AI course.

*Review the course standards, organisation and curriculum in the PADI Course Director Manual.

Assessing candidate readiness*

Typical examples of great tools available for assessing the readiness of a dive leadership candidate are Dive Theory Online, and eLearning Quick Reviews for knowledge and to gauge dive skills use the Skill Evaluation Slate.

*Refer to PADI General Training Standards and Procedures when assessing open water dive readiness.

Remember, if in doubt, contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant.

Other factors to consider

There are other factors to consider during your assessment, before accepting the candidate into your PADI AI or IDC program. Take a moment to verify:

  • When was the candidate certified at dive leadership level by the other agency?
  • Has the candidate acquired any active experience as a dive leader?
  • How recent is this experience?
  • Does the candidate fulfil all other AI / IDC course prerequisites?
  • Can I help the candidate document all prerequisites?

A reminder

Prospective PADI Professionals are required to provide copies of all underlying prerequisite qualifications: their entry-level, advanced, rescue diver certifications and proof of first aid / CPR training within the past two years.  Make sure you verify these and have them on file before accepting the candidate on to the course.  Don’t forget to attach copies of non-PADI certifications when sending their completed application form to PADI for processing.

Following PADIs assessment standards and documentation procedures reduces your risk. It also ensures the candidate (and you!) will have an enjoyable experience during their instructor-level program and avoids unnecessary delays in processing their application upon training completion.

Crossing dive leaders over to PADI professionals is easier than you think. Take a few moments to consider the opportunities you could gain.

Contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant at training-sales@padi.com.au to find out more.

Tony Cook – PADI Regional Training Consultant

Building Water Confidence in Training

Written by PADI Regional Training Consultant, Robert Scammell

As PADI Professionals, especially when based in resort environments with a diverse client base, we face a wide variety of challenges to learning whilst teaching students. These can vary and include differences in educational backgrounds, culture and language. However the greatest thrill as a PADI Professional is seeing the look on your students face when they overcome obstacles and begin enjoying and sharing our passion for the underwater world.

Many of us are familiar with helping students who need help mastering the RDP or clearing their mask and are happy in spending the time with students who may be facing these and many other obstacles. However sometimes we need to remember that maybe we need to wind things back even further and help our students gain confidence, in just, purely being in water.

For many of us confidence in water becomes a motor skill, like walking, running and talking, from an early age. I remember my grandmother, who couldn’t swim, taking me to the local pool once a week as a small boy to ensure I gained the confidence she never had. Others are not so lucky.

With the diverse cultural backgrounds we face in our ever expanding industry we need to remember that we will meet students who wish to enjoy scuba diving as much as the next person but they just need us, as professionals, to help them gain their water confidence. They may have grown up in a land-locked environment, have an embedded cultural fear of water or simply not had those opportunities to build up confidence in the water.

So is it right to assume that our students are comfortable donning mask, fins and snorkel and then spending most of our time talking about BCD’s and regulators when all of the time the student is wondering what the funny things on their feet and face are?

In conversation recently with an instructor he was explaining to me how he found that PADI Discover Scuba Diving participants got a lot more from the program by him helping them don and adjust mask fins and snorkel correctly and helping them initially gain confidence with these before progressing to scuba. Similarly another example is an instructor being aware that he would have to spend more time building water confidence with his PADI Discover Scuba Diving participants and having completed this how much they enjoyed their subsequent open water dives and were hungry to learn more.

Simply by remembering that learning to dive is helping build confident and competent divers and taking the time to help them build basic water skills is equally as important as every other part of training. Bear in mind that sharing our passion helps create the divers of the future so that customer will come back to you, recommend you to a friend and share ever-lasting memories.

Next time you turn up for work and your boss tells you that your students are from “XYZ” country, don’t roll back your eyes and imagine endless problems because of perceived backgrounds. As a PADI Professional, an educator, take on the challenge you may be surprised!

If you have any questions please contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant at training-sales@padi.com.au.

PADI Regional Training Consultant, Robert Scammell

Welcome to our newest PADI Dive Centres and Resorts in Indonesia & Timor-Leste.

It has been a busy year so far in Indonesia and Timor-Leste and despite a few hiccups from mother nature, the industry here is moving forward in leaps and bounds! The high season has kicked in and the diving is sensational.

With consistent certification growth for more than 10 years in a row, the market continues to expand and many are investing into dive businesses across the country.

The great thing about this area of the world is that in some ways it is still an untapped market. For those with a passion for the ocean, a smart business sense and a love for the people and country, the opportunities are endless.

With the strength of the PADI brand behind them, the benefits of membership and the local support on the ground, the below members have chosen PADI as their preferred training organisation so far in 2018:

PADI Dive operations who have joined in 2018:

Our loyal PADI Dive Operations below also deserve a big congratulations for achieving the next level of PADI Membership and have recently upgraded to 5 Star or IDC status Dive Operations:

If you would like to stand out from the crowd and add more to your business there are many additional Dive Centre and Resort awards and ratings available such as becoming a PADI Freediver  or TecRec Centre along with applying for the Green Star Award and becoming 100% AWARE

Once again congratulations to all of the above stores and thank you, to not only them but to all our valued PADI Members who continually support PADI to ensure a healthy and growing industry.

For more information on various business levels of PADI Membership, it’s benefits and how to get started please visit PADI.com or contact your PADI Regional Manager.

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Never Stop Learning

Written by PADI Regional Training Consultant, Robin Bylund.

It’s important that you never stop your own personal professional development. Learning something new helps you stay sharp and the more you learn, the more you can share with your students, friends and guests.

Have you ever looked at a technical diver gearing up for a dive and started pondering if you could do it? I’m sure most of you have seen this at some point while preparing for your own dive or course. What was going through your mind at that point? Maybe it looked very complicated or that there was so much equipment.

I’m sure you have thought to yourself, could I manage technical diving or what’s my next step to further my professional dive skills and course offerings?

It is true technical diving is not for everybody. There is however other options which will give you an insight of some of the procedures and build your confidence to one day take on technical diving through the PADI TecRec program if it appeals to you.

If you’re not ready to take the full step into the PADI TecRec program right now but are curious about giving it a try one day, the courses below are for you. These courses will get you started with some of the equipment and procedures similar to those used technical diving that are still within the recreational scope of PADI programs. Completing these courses will give you an idea of more complex equipment and procedures which will build your overall confidence as a dive professional.

The PADI Sidemount Diver Specialty course can be completed and taught in conjunction with the PADI Open Water Diver Course or at any stage after entry level certification.

What do you learn and how does this relate to technical diving and building your confidence? In sidemount you start using equipment that is more closely related to technical diving such as dual tanks with standalone first stages, regulators and long hoses for gas sharing. The gas management also becomes more important as you will be switching your air consumption between two tanks throughout the entire dive. Furthermore some of the ‘out of air’ situations are primarily managed by you as you have two air supplies. You also learn how to setup and adjust a proper sidemount rig, ‘dual tanks’ or ‘monkey style’.

All these new procedures and equipment configurations take you one step closer to technical diving. Even though you may consider yourself an experienced and confident diver, learning something new will keep sharp as a PADI Professional.

Initially sidemount diving came from cave diving where you need to streamline your equipment and yourself for maximum efficiency. Today it is also a recreational course and a style of diving that suits many type of divers.

The next course which would take you another step closer to technical diving would be PADI Self-Reliant Diver course.

What is this course all about? This Distinctive Specialty course is a great way to build confidence for PADI Professionals. During the course you will be looking at the mindset of a person who is diving alone or is put in a situation where they find themselves alone and how to adjust procedures and equipment needed to be prepared for this.

And this is what is covered and practiced during the course. Skills such as calculating gas consumption and basing dives on this. Other important aspects are redundancy and having back up gas, back up computer, back up knife, back up DSMBs ,etc., so in case the primary equipment fails during a dive, there is a back up to rely on. Last but not least, dive planning which is an essential part of the course is covered to limit risk.

Why is this course important for dive professionals? How many times have you say found yourself taking photos on a fun dive and found yourself a bit away from your buddy and thought to yourself “If something went wrong now who would come to my assistance?” This is why knowing how to look after yourself and be ‘self-reliant’ can be important.

Both of the courses mentioned will boost your confidence and help you stay sharp as a PADI Professional. So take the next step and never stop learning.

If you have any questions please contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant at training-sales@padi.com.au.

PADI Regional Training Consultant, Robin Bylund

PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer Course

There is something quite mesmerising about entering the underwater world on your own terms and only for as long as your breath will allow you. Not only does freediving allow you to extend your personal limits in a gentle manner, but it also encourages you to learn inward control, discipline and power.

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Freediving has become an increasingly popular and powerful way to explore the depths of the ocean floor. If  you have ever wanted to enter the underwater world quietly, without equipment and on a single breath, then freediving is for you! 

In May and for the second time ever, the PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer Course was completed in Cebu, Philippines. The program was hosted by the PADI Asia Pacific team but also had global representation amongst both staff and candidates. This international program bought together 15 candidates from 6 different countries, with presentations being translated into 5 different languages.

During the course, candidates learned about instruction and learning theory, psychology of counselling and evaluation techniques, risk management and marketing. Furthermore, each candidate also completed several teaching assignments and assessments in the classroom, confined water and open water. The program was supported logistically by PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer, Do Yen Kim and staff from Poseidon Cebu. The course also featured a guest speaker presentation by PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer Jean-Pol (JP) Francois from Freediving Planet Moalboal.

Speaking about the event, PADI Territory Director Thomas Knedlik said:

The PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer program brought together experienced PADI Master Freediver Instructors from around the globe. It has been incredible to witness the transformation of several national and international Freediving champions, all of whom with extensive experience teaching the PADI Freediver program, leaving the program with the required skills and knowledge to teach the popular PADI Freediver Instructor Course. The tremendous growth in demand for the courses that were released by PADI in 2015 will ensure these new PADI Freediver Instructor Trainers will have plenty of work and the unmatched marketing and business support provided by PADI will help to support the growth of the Freediving industry in its entire.”

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Interested in becoming a PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer?

Due to its tremendous success and the demand for additional programs, PADI will be running PADI Freediver Instructor Trainer Courses at an ongoing basis, in various locations around the globe.

To apply, candidates will need to be renewed and in teaching status as a PADI Master Freediver Instructor, completed the Emergency First Response Instructor Trainer course and have experience teaching all PADI Freediver program levels beyond those required for the PADI Master Freediver Instructor level.

In addition, applicants will need to have experience staffing PADI Freediver Instructor training courses and not have had any verified Quality Management complaints in the last 12 months, prior to the course date.

For further information about the Freediver Instructor Trainer Course, it’s prerequisites, requirements and future programs, please contact your Regional Manager.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Register Now for our Free PADI Training Bulletin Live Webinars

Please join us for one of these live, interactive presentations of the PADI Training Bulletin, Fourth Quarter 2017 Edition. During these FREE presentations you will have explained the latest standard changes, plus you can test your knowledge with a series of fun and interactive poll questions.

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Training Bulletin LIVE- 3Q18 English 

Tuesday 17th July 2018, 6pm AEST (UTC+11)

Training Bulletin LIVE- 3Q18 Korean

Thursday 26th July 2018, 2pm KST (UTC+9)

Training Bulletin LIVE- 3Q18 Chinese

Tuesday 24th July 2018, 6pm CST (UTC+8)

What do you need to do before the event?

First of all make sure you are registered by clicking the relevant link above. The above listed starting times are in the presenters’ local time zones – to ensure you don’t miss out, please verify the equivalent in your own time zone.

On the day all you will need is a computer/tablet or notebook connected to the internet and a set of speakers or headphones to listen in. Login early to ensure your system is functioning properly.

For more information about using the GoToMeeting software reference the GoToMeeting Attendee Quick Reference Guide (PDF).

You can download the latest PADI Training Bulletin by logging into the PADI Pros’ Site and then clicking on ‘Training Essentials’ and ‘Training Bulletins’. It is useful to have a copy for your immediate reference when you are listening to webinar. Under this heading you will also find recordings on previous webinars and registration links to future events.

Seminar Credits

If you sign up and attend this webinar plus another two PADI Asia Pacific LIVE webinars within a 12-month period, you will receive one seminar credit, which can count towards a future PADI Master Instructor or Course Director Application. To receive a seminar credit for having attended three live webinars, or for having watched three recordings of webinars, please submit either the webinar confirmation email or write a brief synopsis about what was presented during the webinar then submit these documents together with your Master Instructor or Course Director Training Course application.

 

We look forward to seeing you online!

For more information please email training-sales@padi.com.au 

Maximise Your Potential

Written by PADI Regional Training Consultant, Mark Wastall.

One of the beauties with the PADI System of diver education is how flexible it can be, how easily adapted it’s timeline is, how it can cater for a variety of diving styles, how much it has moved with the times and how much potential there is to keep divers learning.

This style of training means that we, as Instructors, have the ability to be able to add to our students experience and add to the revenue generated from the course. The latter should be great news if you own or run your own dive centre, if you are a freelance Instructor paid by the course or an independent Instructor looking to maximise earning potential.

It is very easy to become blinkered into only teaching the course that is in front of you. ‘The student has asked for a PADI Open Water Course, that’s what I’ll teach them’ is a mindset that a lot of Instructors develop. We can sometimes miss the glaring opportunities that we are presented with. How many times have you told an Open Water student that they cannot take a camera on the training dives as it’s ‘against standards’ but were you aware that you can, in fact, link the PADI Open Water Course with PADI Digital Underwater Photographer LVL1? The knowledge development can be done at any time during the course. The Level 1 Photo dive can be done in confined after confined dive 3 or in the open water as part of the tour potion of dive 4. With 1 more dive after the PADI Open Water Course and the student has Level 2. As simple as that, you have just earned 2 certifications from 1 student, extra revenue for yourself or your dive center and you now have a student who can happily and comfortably take photos underwater. This could also lead to retail potential on top if you are a centre that has the opportunity to sell equipment.

With just a quick look at the PADI Instructor Manual, General Standards and Procedures, you can see how our courses can be linked together and how students can easily earn credit towards the next level of their diving. With this knowledge, you can help increase your Con-Ed ratios. A great help if you are working towards PADI Master Instructor or PADI Course Director.

Another easy course to link with any of the core courses is PADI Enriched Air Diver Course. The theory can be combined during the PADI Open Water Course for example and goes hand in hand when explaining No Decompression Limits. The practical application exercise can be conducted at any time during the course, maybe at the pool during equipment setup. As an enriched air dive is not required, this course can be run with very little overheads but again is 2 certifications and extra revenue.

These extra dives can also count towards a student’s PADI Advanced Open Water Course if the knowledge reviews have been completed or again, why not combine an Enriched Air tank on a deep dive of the PADI Advanced Open Water.

It doesn’t need to stop there either, adding PADI O2 Provider to the PADI Rescue Course is another way to upsell a course with very little extra time or outlay. The training structure can be your friend. Look for the opportunities, maximise your potential.

For further advice please don’t hesitate to contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant on training-sales@padi.com.au.