The Undersea Journal – Fourth Quarter 2018 – Now Available

Each quarter The Undersea Journal is filled with stories and articles that help you stay informed and inspired as a PADI Professional.

The Fourth Quarter 2018 edition includes articles on Trends in Teaching and Training, Digital Optimization, The Revised Project AWARE Specialty Course,  Dive Travel, Family Additions, Gear and much more.

There are several digital reading options for you to access this publication:

If you’ve opted for the printed version, it will continue to be delivered to your mailing address.

If you have any questions please contact customerservice.ap@padi.com.

Crossing over dive leaders to PADI Professionals

By Tony Cook, PADI Regional Training Consultant

Frankie owns a PADI Five Star Dive Resort in Thailand. At a local bar after work, he chats to a group of French tourists. One of them, Amina, says she is a dive leader from France and is looking for work in Thailand. Frankie does need a new instructor, but tells her he can only employ PADI Pros. He says she should contact him again if she eventually gets her PADI qualification.

What opportunities has Frankie just lost?

  1. A potential employee.
  2. Greater income from new students. While there is a cost for Frankie in crossing a diver over from recognized French organisation to PADI, the potential income she could generate is far greater.
  3. Fresh ideas – Amina might have other great skills like social media or IT skills that Frankie doesn’t have.
  4. New markets – Amina could attract more French and European customers to Frankie’s business.

Crossover process

What Frankie didn’t know is that a dive leader in good standing qualified with another diver training organisation can cross over to PADI via the PADI Assistant Instructor (AI) course or the PADI Instructor Development Course (IDC). They do not have to repeat what they already know and can do.

*Remember to contact and involve your PADI Regional Training Consultant early in the crossover process if you have any questions on eligibility.

What should Frankie have done instead?

Frankie should have checked Amina’s qualifications together with Steve, a PADI IDC Staff Instructor who works for him.  After verifying that all the course prerequisites have been met, Steve could have enrolled Amina in the AI course*. Steve would then have conducted a knowledge and skill pre-assessment with Amina – any necessary remediation training can be personalised and scheduled before the start of the AI course.

*Review the course standards, organisation and curriculum in the PADI Course Director Manual.

Assessing candidate readiness*

Typical examples of great tools available for assessing the readiness of a dive leadership candidate are Dive Theory Online, and eLearning Quick Reviews for knowledge and to gauge dive skills use the Skill Evaluation Slate.

*Refer to PADI General Training Standards and Procedures when assessing open water dive readiness.

Remember, if in doubt, contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant.

Other factors to consider

There are other factors to consider during your assessment, before accepting the candidate into your PADI AI or IDC program. Take a moment to verify:

  • When was the candidate certified at dive leadership level by the other agency?
  • Has the candidate acquired any active experience as a dive leader?
  • How recent is this experience?
  • Does the candidate fulfil all other AI / IDC course prerequisites?
  • Can I help the candidate document all prerequisites?

A reminder

Prospective PADI Professionals are required to provide copies of all underlying prerequisite qualifications: their entry-level, advanced, rescue diver certifications and proof of first aid / CPR training within the past two years.  Make sure you verify these and have them on file before accepting the candidate on to the course.  Don’t forget to attach copies of non-PADI certifications when sending their completed application form to PADI for processing.

Following PADIs assessment standards and documentation procedures reduces your risk. It also ensures the candidate (and you!) will have an enjoyable experience during their instructor-level program and avoids unnecessary delays in processing their application upon training completion.

Crossing dive leaders over to PADI professionals is easier than you think. Take a few moments to consider the opportunities you could gain.

Contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant at training-sales@padi.com.au to find out more.

Tony Cook – PADI Regional Training Consultant

Building Water Confidence in Training

Written by PADI Regional Training Consultant, Robert Scammell

As PADI Professionals, especially when based in resort environments with a diverse client base, we face a wide variety of challenges to learning whilst teaching students. These can vary and include differences in educational backgrounds, culture and language. However the greatest thrill as a PADI Professional is seeing the look on your students face when they overcome obstacles and begin enjoying and sharing our passion for the underwater world.

Many of us are familiar with helping students who need help mastering the RDP or clearing their mask and are happy in spending the time with students who may be facing these and many other obstacles. However sometimes we need to remember that maybe we need to wind things back even further and help our students gain confidence, in just, purely being in water.

For many of us confidence in water becomes a motor skill, like walking, running and talking, from an early age. I remember my grandmother, who couldn’t swim, taking me to the local pool once a week as a small boy to ensure I gained the confidence she never had. Others are not so lucky.

With the diverse cultural backgrounds we face in our ever expanding industry we need to remember that we will meet students who wish to enjoy scuba diving as much as the next person but they just need us, as professionals, to help them gain their water confidence. They may have grown up in a land-locked environment, have an embedded cultural fear of water or simply not had those opportunities to build up confidence in the water.

So is it right to assume that our students are comfortable donning mask, fins and snorkel and then spending most of our time talking about BCD’s and regulators when all of the time the student is wondering what the funny things on their feet and face are?

In conversation recently with an instructor he was explaining to me how he found that PADI Discover Scuba Diving participants got a lot more from the program by him helping them don and adjust mask fins and snorkel correctly and helping them initially gain confidence with these before progressing to scuba. Similarly another example is an instructor being aware that he would have to spend more time building water confidence with his PADI Discover Scuba Diving participants and having completed this how much they enjoyed their subsequent open water dives and were hungry to learn more.

Simply by remembering that learning to dive is helping build confident and competent divers and taking the time to help them build basic water skills is equally as important as every other part of training. Bear in mind that sharing our passion helps create the divers of the future so that customer will come back to you, recommend you to a friend and share ever-lasting memories.

Next time you turn up for work and your boss tells you that your students are from “XYZ” country, don’t roll back your eyes and imagine endless problems because of perceived backgrounds. As a PADI Professional, an educator, take on the challenge you may be surprised!

If you have any questions please contact your PADI Regional Training Consultant at training-sales@padi.com.au.

PADI Regional Training Consultant, Robert Scammell

Welcome to our newest PADI Dive Centres and Resorts in Indonesia & Timor-Leste.

It has been a busy year so far in Indonesia and Timor-Leste and despite a few hiccups from mother nature, the industry here is moving forward in leaps and bounds! The high season has kicked in and the diving is sensational.

With consistent certification growth for more than 10 years in a row, the market continues to expand and many are investing into dive businesses across the country.

The great thing about this area of the world is that in some ways it is still an untapped market. For those with a passion for the ocean, a smart business sense and a love for the people and country, the opportunities are endless.

With the strength of the PADI brand behind them, the benefits of membership and the local support on the ground, the below members have chosen PADI as their preferred training organisation so far in 2018:

PADI Dive operations who have joined in 2018:

Our loyal PADI Dive Operations below also deserve a big congratulations for achieving the next level of PADI Membership and have recently upgraded to 5 Star or IDC status Dive Operations:

If you would like to stand out from the crowd and add more to your business there are many additional Dive Centre and Resort awards and ratings available such as becoming a PADI Freediver  or TecRec Centre along with applying for the Green Star Award and becoming 100% AWARE

Once again congratulations to all of the above stores and thank you, to not only them but to all our valued PADI Members who continually support PADI to ensure a healthy and growing industry.

For more information on various business levels of PADI Membership, it’s benefits and how to get started please visit PADI.com or contact your PADI Regional Manager.

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